How to Write a Blog on LinkedIn

Are you looking for a platform where you can show your expertise and make connections that will grow your business?

 

Today, ReminderMedia’s Brand Content Manager Jessi Carlin shows you how to write an article on LinkedIn.

Video Transcription

While so many businesses are focused on creating content for platforms like Facebook and Instagram, LinkedIn offers a ton of opportunities for connecting with other businesses. By sharing valuable insights or commentary, you can grow awareness of your brand in a big way.

To create an article or blog, start by logging in to your LinkedIn account. Near the top of your homepage, click Write an Article. This will bring up LinkedIn’s built-in publishing tool. This one page has everything you need to create an article that you can share with your network—and it’s actually really easy to use.

Where it says headline, you can type in the title of your article. I’m going to call mine “King of Prussia Real Estate Market Update.” Underneath your headline, you’ll find the body section. To start writing your actual article, simply begin typing. Or, if you’ve already written the text portion of your article, you can copy and paste it right here.

Up at the top of the screen, you’ll see you can change your font by clicking the drop-down menu that says Normal. You can use this to create subheadings, or just add extra emphasis on certain parts of your article. You can also make your text bold, italicized, or underlined.

These next two buttons will allow you to create bulleted lists. To the right of those, you can click the double quote icon to create block quotes, which are indented and italicized. And you can click the icon to the right of the quotes to insert a link.

Download a sample of our customizable marketing tool, American Lifestyle.

Notice that, when you’re typing text into the body of your article, there’s a square icon with a little plus sign at the bottom. This block follows you as you type. By clicking on this icon, you can add an image, video, slides, or a link to your article. Just make your selection, and then follow the instructions on your screen. To add another item, simply hit the Enter key to create a new line, and then click the icon again.

Above your headline, you’ll see an illustration of two photos with a plus sign. Click this to upload your cover photo. Your cover photo appears at the top of your article, as well as when your article is shared across LinkedIn or around the web.

At the top of the screen, you’ll see the word Saved. Like Google Docs and almost any other online publishing tool, LinkedIn automatically saves your work every time you make an edit. If you want to finish your article later, all you need to do is to come back into the editor and click the Drafts button. Then, click the name of your article from the menu that pops up and continue to work on it.

When you’re all done your article, click the Publish button in the upper-right corner of your screen. There’s just one more step before your post goes live. In the box that pops up, type in a short description or teaser for what you wrote. For example, you could say, “Here are my thoughts on the current local real estate market.” When the post shows up in your followers’ feeds, this text is the first thing they’ll see, so be sure to make a strong impression.

Congratulations! You’ve just published your first article on LinkedIn. A box will pop up that allows you to message people in your network with a link to your article, or to share it on other social media platforms. You can also click to get a link to your article, which you can share on your blog, through email, text message, or anywhere else you’d like.

The takeaway

If you liked this video, comment below and let us know. Be sure to follow us on LinkedIn, @remindermedia. And subscribe to this YouTube channel for more great social media tips. But, most importantly, take action on this today.

Written by Kevin McElvaney

Zealous wordie and reluctant writer of short bios. I'm dedicated to creating useful and educational content.