Ep. 26: How to Write Copy that Sells

Powerful sales copy is an intricate part of closing a deal. But, for many service-based sales professionals, writing can seem like a daunting task that no one wants to tackle.

In this episode of Stay Paid, Luke and Josh sit down with our very own Digital Designer, Dan Acree, as he provides a framework that you can use to take action, toss aside your fears, and start writing copy that sells.

 Key Points

  • You first have to determine what your ultimate goal is
  • Defining your audience will help you tailor your copy
  • Don’t try to be someone you’re not

There is no magic formula  

Dan stresses that when it comes to writing copy, there’s no magic formula. There’s not a one-size-fits-all solution. Good sales copy depends on a multitude of different factors. For starters, answering a set of questions can help you develop a general foundation.

What is your intent?

First, you have to determine what your ultimate goal is. Understanding your intent and your goal plays a large part in your buyer’s journey. Not only do you have to figure out where you are trying to find your prospects, but also what you are trying to get them to do. This is going to help guide your overall message.

But, when it comes to determining your intent, one of the big things that Dan tends to focus on is understanding his audience.

Who is your audience?

Intent and audience go hand-in-hand. Knowing your audience is one thing, but possessing empathy with your audience makes a world of difference. Being able to put yourself in the prospects’ shoes as they’re engaging with your content is critical to your writing success.

If you don’t naturally possess empathy, try not to stress. A great tip is to spend an hour or two reading the reviews of your clients and competitors. See what people are saying and what type of language they’re using—this will help you connect.

Next, consider how your copy will change based on your audience. For example, in real estate your language will alter drastically if you’re writing for a first-time homebuyer versus an empty nester.

What is your medium?

Email

After months of experimenting, we’ve found that keeping our emails short and conversational has proven to be much more successful than long-winded messages. Also, getting people hooked within the first sentence is crucial to your success.

Landing Page

Bullet points are great for landing pages. It breaks up the message and allows your readers to be able to focus on the main points.

In addition, the way that we digest copy on the Internet is different than print. On the web, our eyes naturally scan the top of the page, then they shift down and skip the next section. It’s important to focus on these areas—the top and middle. This is where you want your most powerful statements to be.

Facebook

Should Facebook ads consist of a lot or a little text? This is the million-dollar question that doesn’t really have an answer. Dan stresses that again, there’s no magic formula. Your ad has to work with the overall concept and your audience. For example, millennials have extremely short attention spans, so if you’re targeting first-time homebuyers, then you’ll want to keep the copy to a minimum to immediately capture their attention.

What are your strengths?

Focus on your strengths—we all have them! When it comes to writing, it’s best to double down on your unique strengths and ignore your weaknesses. For instance, if you’re a formal person, be formal. If you’re a funny person, be funny. Don’t try to be someone that you’re not. You sound more genuine if you are yourself. Your weaknesses are not going to help you generate leads for your business.

Action Items

Following this podcast, our goal is to provide you with as many actionable tips as possible. For this podcast, they include…

  • Before you send an email this week, ask yourself the following questions—what is your intent, who is your audience, what is your medium, and what are your strengths.

As always, take action on these tips!