Make a Good Impression with Useful Promotional Items

Though many businesses focus heavily on their digital marketing efforts, the overwhelming amount of advertising on the web and social media can make it difficult for your brand to stay top of mind. That’s why it’s important not to overlook options for reaching people in the “real world.”

One of the best ways to maintain brand awareness is by giving your clients something relevant—an item that will either be useful to them right now or is likely to stick around their home for the foreseeable future.

Here are some suggestions for impression pieces that will not only get your clients’ attention today but also help you build business relationships that will truly last.

Refrigerator magnets

Real estate agents have been using magnetic business cards to stay top of mind for years, and there’s a good reason why. Custom fridge magnets provide all the benefits of a business card with none of the disposability of paper.

Think about it: you’ve misplaced at least a few business cards at some point. But how many magnets have been stuck to your fridge for years? For salespeople who rely on repeat business over long periods of time, that kind of staying power is invaluable.

Stress balls

In recent years, branded stress balls have become an increasingly popular promotional item. They’re great to have on your desk, where you can give them a light squeeze when you’re feeling overworked or overwhelmed.

If you’re providing your clients with a service that genuinely makes their lives easier, they’ll already associate you with the feeling of stress melting away. A stress ball bearing your brand’s logo will (gently) hammer that point home.

Coffee mugs

A 2018 survey found that 64 percent of Americans drink coffee every day. That’s an awful lot of people who could be looking at your logo or likeness daily. A custom coffee mug has the added benefit of being a relatively inexpensive piece of swag, which you can easily order more of when you run out.

Bonus suggestion: Consider including your company’s logo on one side, with a slogan or “pick-me-up” phrase on the other. Your clients will quickly learn to associate you and your brand with positive thinking.

Gift baskets

If you’d like to send something a little more personal to your customer or prospect, gift baskets are always a great option. There are plenty of services out there offering baskets containing everything from fresh fruit to luxury items like fine wines and spa packages. But, for the full effect, you can spend a little time assembling a basket yourself.

Using what you know about what your client likes—which you’ve hopefully recorded in your CRM—you can put together a custom package containing items you’re sure they will love. Be sure to include a personal note with your contact information. They’ll be more inclined to follow up with you afterward, which will let you know your efforts didn’t go unnoticed.

Your personal magazine

While all of the above are great ways to stay top of mind with your customers, they aren’t exactly dynamic. In other words, your mug or magnet won’t look any better in a few months, while the contents of your gift basket could be gone in a matter of days. By sending clients a personal magazine—addressed to them, containing your branding and a customized message— you’re offering a completely different kind of value.

Whether your magazine is American Lifestyle or Start Healthy, each issue will contain useful advice, compelling articles, and delicious recipes that your clients will want to share with their family and friends. Luckily, you can also offer to send the magazine to anyone in their circle, which will give you the opportunity to build a relationship with a fresh prospect.

Whichever impression piece you choose, make sure you’ve included all of your contact information, which encourages your clients to reach out to you in the near future. And, of course, don’t let your follow-up efforts end here­—business relationships, like relationships of any other kind, require effort. When you go the extra mile, it shows.

Written by Kevin McElvaney

Zealous wordie and reluctant writer of short bios.